Saturday, May 03, 2008

dew and gorse for breakfast


stopped off,on the way back from the school run.it was nice and foggy,shame the fog got burned off rather quickly,but the dew on the grass with its strange colors kept me entertained for a little hour.now time for some eggs...oil on canvas 7x9"



the same view as the last painting,this time looking down...
usually i shy away from the big view,not very good at it or maybe i'm just lazy.after the blog-in i stepped back only to see my easel being blown over down the hill,painting face down all my turps gone and some colorful grass! luckily i had some spare brushes to use for each color as cleaning them was not easy...
oil on canvas 7x9"

10 comments:

Dianne Mize said...

That happened to me. It was at the edge of a yard in early spring, the grass having cut two days prior. So just as I was finishing up, the wind took easel, painting and all face down, covering the entire painting with dead grass clippings. Had to pluck each one off, one at a time, with a painting knife.

These two have a nice glow. You wouldn't know you were doing all that brush shifting. I enjoy your work tremendously.

Keith Tilley said...

Well done for persevering. It would have been so easy to have given up, but you have created a nice painting.

Parapluie said...

I am amazed at how much Wales is like Oregon, US. Your paintings feel like the atmosphere here. Not only did we have snow in April we also have an invasive non-native plant - Gorse. But there is a difference, in your paintings there is a yellow bush here and there. In Southern Oregon along the coast the Gorse is a solid mass of thorns and yellow flowers taking over all native plants for acres and acres. The weed has been devestating to feed production for livestock and to crops for textiles. A Cornell University report estimates the economic impact of the weeds in the US is $34.7 billion annually. Oregon Public Broadcasting is making a public appeal and campain to stop the silent invasion of invasive weeds.
Is Gorse native to Wales and is it in balance? If so what keeps it from spreading all over?
Last weekend I did a painting of English Ivy strangling a tree. I think I made it too nice. I seem to find beauty in everything.

rob ijbema said...

hi Dianne,apart from the shock,it wasn't much of a problem,luckely...
thank you for the very nice comment!

rob ijbema said...

no choice but to carry on Keith
it wasn't that bad...

rob ijbema said...

it is not as bad here Diahne with the gorse,sometimes they burn it off,here the brecon is taking over,wich is red in the winter and mint green in the summer.
some people think dandylions are a weed but i love them too...

Parapluie said...

Rod
Maybe our problem with the Gorse is that we don't accept change and we are impatient. I read in wikipedia that there are more than one Gorse with the common Gorse having the most spines. Also read that native birds find shelter in these plants, the Gorse provides nutrients to the soil and is ground for winter feed for live stock. That native trees grow through the Gorse and eventually their shade eventually dominates and eliminates the Gorse. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Furze

Cara Dawn Romero said...

Rob - these are lovely paintings - I also love the industrial peice below. Your style is so soft, just beautiful.

rob ijbema said...

i can ubderstand the birds find shelter in the gorse Parapluie ,they must be totally safe there.
also did you know it can bloom every month of the year except for December?

rob ijbema said...

Cara,sometimes i think my style is a bit to soft,that is way i tried the industrial scene to see if i could sharpen up